Diving Safety

safety is the most important part of any dive, and scuba divers would do well to remember that most accidents are caused by

  • Diving Accidents
  • It is obvious that all divers hope never to have to face an emergency involving themselves or others. However, if an emergency does happen, the dive guides and captains, who are trained in first aid, can deliver primary care. Nevertheless, in this chapter, we will briefly refresh the knowledge learnt in diving courses and look into decompression illness (DCI) and its prevention.
  • The isolation of the reefs in the south, especially in the Marine Park and St. John’s, considerably complicates immediate first aid and the transport of injured divers-airborne rescue services by helicopter or other aircraft are unavailable because of the great distances. Therefore, passengers or crew members must be given primary care on board and brought to shore by their own boat. It takes at least eight hours to sail from St. John’s to the nearest decompression chamber in Hamata, thus delaying the proper treatment of diving accidents. Therefore, it is crucial to pay particular attention to the prevention of accidents, so that they do not occur in the first place
  • Fortunately, diving accidents seldom happen in 2007 an average of only 4.7 out of 10,000 dives led to the onset of decompression illness (DAN, 2007). The vast majority of diving accidents are caused by mistakes made by the diver. The common causes are the wrong use of diving equipment, insufficient knowledge or simply an overestimation of the diver’s own capabilities.

  • Insurance DCI may require treatment in a decompression chamber. Note that the costs thereby incurred are not covered by the standard kinds of health insurance and are always very high (in the five-figure range in euros). It is therefore highly recommended that divers take out their own diving insurance, like the one offered by Diver’s Alert Network (DAN).
  • We would like to reiterate the importance of the basic measures used to prevent decompression accidents. Although every diver should know them from his or her previous training, they are often either forgotten or ignored. Therefore, let us go through the most important points.
  • Diver Training and Prolonged Breaks from Diving
  • With time, the knowledge gained from training is forgotten. Prolonged breaks from diving effect learnt diving routines and make the knowledge gained in the past fade. It certainly is of no harm to go through the course material once more to refresh one’s knowledge.
  • Safety Stop 5/3
  • A safety stop should always be carried out before the end of each dive. It is done at a depth of five metres, lasts at least three minutes and helps in the exhalation of excess nitrogen.
  • Depth
  • Long and deep dives should only be carried out with adequate training and equipment (see Depth Limits by Law.
  • Drinking
  • It is essential to drink fluids between dives. Two to three litres of water in addition to the normal amount will supply the blood with enough fluid to quickly be able to eliminate the nitrogen absorbed during a dive. Drink small sips of water throughout the day to reduce the need to urinate while diving. You will regret drinking a large amount of water at once during the next dive.
  • Alcohol
  • Alcohol dehydrates the body and has no place in diving. As already mentioned, it is forbidden to consume alcohol as long as you plan to go diving.
  • Obesity
  • Since adipose tissue absorbs nitrogen in large quantities, people who are overweight should dive carefully.
  • Fatigue and Stress
  • In general refrain from diving when feeling unwell.
  • EMERGENCY TELEPHONE NUMBERS Hyperbaric

  • Emergency frequency
  • VHF channel 16 (156.8 MHz, international emergencies)
  • 1. Press the talk button
  • 2. Communicate the name of your boat
  • 3. Ask for the desired contact person (if known)
  • 4. Announce the emergency
  • 5. Release the talk button
  • .6 Wait shortly for confirmation
  • Repeat steps 1-6 until contact is made. Then follow the instructions that are given.

Decompression Chambers

  • SHARM EL SHEIKH
  • Hyperbaric Medical Center
  • Emergency Tel. (+20) 12 2124 292
  • Tel. (+2) 693660922/ (+2) 693660923
  • SHARM HOSPITAL
  • Emergency Tel. (+2) 010 512 3964
  • Tel. (+2) 693660318
  • DAHAB
  • Emergency Tel. (+2) 010 143 3325
  • Tel. (+2) 069 364 0536
  • EL GOUNA
  • Emergency Tel. (+2) 065 3850 0118
  • Tel. (+2) 01222190383
  • HURGHADA
  • HYPEMED
  • Emergency Tel. (+2) 010 218 7550
  • Tel. (+2) 01119188819
  • NAVAL HYPERBARIC
  • Emergency Tel. (+2) 065 3449 150
  • Tel. (+2) 653449151
  • SAFAGA
  • SAFAGA DECO INTERNATIONAL
  • Emergency Tel. (+2) 012 219 0383
  • Marsa Alam
  • Baromedical
  • Emergency Tel: (+20) 122 433 116
  • (+20) 124 36 2222
  • Deco International
  • Emergency Tel (+02) 122 190 383
  • Hamata
  • Deco International Hyperbaric
  • Emergency Tel. +20 122 190 383
  • International emergency number of DAN-Europe: (+39) 06 42 11 86 85

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