Whats liveaboard

  • All divers dream of this daily schedule: sleeping – diving – eating-diving-sleeping – diving, all in the bright sunshine and Clear Due water of one of the most diverse coral seas on earth. This dream is not fiction, however, Burada day-to-day life on a liveaboard in the Red Sea. Diving safaris in the Red Sea are enjoying increasing popularity with good reason: hardly any other kind of diving holiday is as stress-free and comfortable for the guests. The liveaboard-a sailing hotel-brings them directly to the most beautiful reefs and dive sites, thereby sparing them from having to cover long distances by foot or by boat. It even allows them to visit remote dive sites, which can either only be reached with difficulty from the shore by daily boats, or not at all. Furthermore, the guests do not have to assemble and then disassemble their diving gear before and after each dive, the scuba set remains ready for use on the dive deck during the entire tour. The guests simply put it on before diving and enter the water a few steps away. Another reason for the great popularity of diving safaris is its excellent value for money. There are currently a large number of tour operators who offer diving safaris adapted to the level of the guests’ diving experience in different price ranges throughout the year. Naturally, there are also reasons why you might prefer to a stay at a hotel rather than go on a diving safari, such as if you wish to engage in activities other than scuba diving, or if you are travelling with family members who do not dive. Even then you can go on day trips to many of the reefs described 

  • Whats Liveaboard
  • Liveaboard routes
  • Although some tour operators also offer two or even three-week diving safaris, the vast majority of people book only one week onboard a liveaboard. If you also do so, you will obviously not be able to dive throughout the entire Red Sea and will instead be limited to a regional safari route because of the size of the dive sites and distances between them. Always take into aLiveaboardccount that the chosen route may occasionally vary depending on the weather.
  • Whats Liveaboard
  • Liveaboard routes
  • Although some tour operators also offer two or even three-week diving safaris, the vast majority of people book only one week onboard a liveaboard. If you also do so, you will obviously not be able to dive throughout the entire Red Sea and will instead be limited to a regional safari route because of the size of the dive sites and distances between them. Always take into aLiveaboardccount that the chosen route may occasionally vary depending on the weather.
  • Tours to the North
  • Though the North is outside the region described in this book, it is mentioned for the sake of completeness. Here you will sail in the area around Hurghada and the Sinai Peninsula. It is also known as “The Wreck Tour” since the greatest number of shipwrecks can be found in this part of the Red Sea-in no other tour is it possible to dive to a different sunken ship during almost every dive.
  • Tours to the South
  • The South here refers to the area between Hurghada and the headland of Ras Banas. Its name derives from a time when diving was mainly done around the Sinai, and all areas south of Hurghada were called “the South” for the sake of simplicity. Currently, it would be more correct to call it “the Centre”, since liveaboards now take their passengers much further south. Tours to the South are particularly suitable for less experienced divers since the reefs often provide very easy diving conditions. Its highlights are the Fury Shoals (Abu Galawa Kebira, Shaab Claudio), Shaab Sharm and Elphinstone.
  • Tours to the Deep South
  • This route runs from Ras Banas down to the areas near the border with Sudan. The ports of departure and arrival are usually Marsa Alam, Port Ghalib and Hamata. Though the areas in the Deep South were rarely visited a few years ago, they are booming now because of their beauty and the unspoiled state of their reefs. Many of them are suitable for inexperienced divers, and even experienced divers will enjoy themselves tremendously at the many reefs with steep walls. The highlights of a tour to the Deep South are St. John’s reefs (Habili Ali, Gota Kebira, Umm Arouk, Habili Gaffar) and Foul Bay (Umm Chararim, Sernaka).
  • Tours to the Marine Park
  • Tours to the Marine Park lead to five dive sites located offshore. They are far away from the coast, between 60 and 80 km from the mainland. The most popular dive sites, the Brother Islands, or Marine Park 1, lie east of El Quseir. Daedalus Reef lies east of Hamata, and it takes about eight hours to sail there from the Brother Islands. Another 150 km (about 11 hours by boat) to the south lie Zabargad Island and Rocky Island, which like Daedalus Reef belong to Marine Park 2. Because of the great distances between them, all these dive sites are rarely visited in a single week. The common routes are Brother Islands – Daedalus – Elphinstone; and Daedalus – Zabargad – Rocky

  • Tour Seasons
  • All tours are offered throughout the year, and each season offers its own particular advantages and disadvantages. Apart from the busy holiday months of July and August, the peak season for diving safaris in this region is in September and October-be prepared for crowding at almost all dive sites in these months. Those who want to see big fish should book a Marine Park tour for the spring or autumn since the water temperature is higher in the summer making sharks retreat to the depths. Moreover, strong winds prevail in the cooler months, which leads to difficult diving conditions. All in all, summer is the most favourable season for beginners.
  • Tips Regarding Day-to-Day Life on Board
  • Divers who have been on a liveaboard will already know the information in the following paragraphs—it is for the less experienced divers that we have summarized this useful information about life onboard a diving boat. The following tips are primarily for the safety of the passengers. They ensure more comfort and a smooth day-to-day life on board as well as a good relationship between the passengers and crew.
  • No Shoes on Board
  • Apart from leading to the risk of slipping or stumbling, shoes should not be worn on board mainly out of respect for the crew for them the ship is not only their workplace but also their home, which is never entered with shoes in Muslim countries. In any case, there is no need for shoes on board.
  • Ship’s Bell
  • The bell is rung every time the passengers should come together. It may mean that the food is ready, that the briefing for the next dive is about to start or that something else needs to be discussed. The bell is of course also rung in case of an emergency. Therefore never ring it just for fun.
  • Cigarettes and Garbage
  • Smoking is allowed on board,
  • but only outdoors. Doing so in the saloon or in the cabins is strictly prohibited to prevent fires. Since a single cigarette butt poisons about 100 litres of water with nicotine, tar and other pollutants, they should never be thrown into the sea, but rather into the ashtrays that are usually found all around on board. It should be obvious that other kinds of rubbish should end in the rubbish bin and not in the sea.
  • Drinking-Water
  • The human body loses much more water than usual through the wind, heat and dry air, which is why diving safari participants should, in addition to the usual daily requirement, drink at least two additional litres or more. Drinking sufficient water is especially important when diving. Some boats have disposable water bottles, while others have water dispensers. In case of the latter, it is advised that you to bring your own outdoor bottle or even a plastic bottle and label it with your name for repeated use, whereby you will significantly contribute to a reduction in waste.
  • whats to have to know onboard?
  • Water Consumption/Showers
  • Many boats have a seawater desalination system and can recycle used water at any time. Ships without it must fill their tanks with water before departure, in which case particular attention should be paid to the water usage so that the supplies will last for the entire journey. When taking a shower while the boat is sailing, make sure to hold on to something firmly to avoid slipping.
  • Toilet Paper
  • Under no circumstances should toilet paper be thrown into the toilet. The drainpipes and sewage pump will get clogged immediately.
  • Protection Against the Sun
  • Do not underestimate the effect of the sun on the open sea. Because of the constant wind, you will often notice the sun’s strength too late. Anyone who has ever tried to put on a wetsuit while having a sunburn will certainly avoid the painful experience in the future by applying sunscreen and wearing a t-shirt.
  • Protecting Your Ears from the Wind
  • Through frequent diving and the constant wind at sea, divers’ ears are put under enormous strain. Ear infections usually force you to skip diving for a few days-if not even for the rest of the tour. However, they can easily be prevented by wearing a headband that covers your ears to protect them from the wind on deck. Also, remove the sea salt from your ear canal by gently rinsing your ears with fresh water when taking a shower.
  • Air Conditioning
  • As wonderful as air conditioning can be, it can also have adverse effects during a diving tour; if it is set too high, you can easily catch a cold. Therefore, always use it wisely, or if you can stand the heat turn it off completely.
  • Transit
  • The ship may rock heavily on the waves when sailing from one reef to the next, and the waves may lap over the hull onto the deck. The first rule in such a situation is to close the cabin portholes and hatches to avoid the risk that laptops, cell phones, clothing and other belongings will get damaged by the water. Additionally, all fragile items such as dive lights and sensitive electronic equipment should be stowed away in a way that prevents them from falling.
  • Dive Roster
  • For the safety of the divers, a so-called dive roster is maintained on every boat with information on who is underwater and when he or she has returned safely on board. Registration is mandatory.
  • Mobile Phones
  • There is no connection to mobile networks far out at sea at the Marine Park and south of the Fury Shoals, which renders mobile phones nothing more than alarm clocks
  • How aliveboard ?
  • The Crew
  • Captain
  • It is the captain’s overall responsibility to ensure the safety of the passengers, the crew and the ship. He will make all reasonable effort to attend to the demands of the divers. Nevertheless, he may from time to time give the order not to visit a dive site as planned due to bad weather and the hazards involved.
  • Dive Guide
  • Every ship has at least one dive guide, and depending on the route there may even be several guides. Dive guides are responsible for all diving activities and the welfare of the passengers. They are the ones who decide whether, when, where and how the dives will take place. Though they are not integrated into the ship’s hierarchy, they are the second-highest authority on board after the captain.
  • First Officer
  • The first officer is the representative and right hand of the captain.
  • Ship’s Mechanic/Machinist
  • By law, every ship must have a mechanic. This unenviable crew member mostly carries out his service in the extremely hot and noisy engine room and makes sure that all the machines run smoothly, from the main engine to the air conditioning. Especially on high seas, it is extremely important for the ship’s safety that the engines are always working. When there is little to do in the engine room, the mechanic also helps to fill the diving tanks.
  • Filler (Compressor Boy)
  • The filler’s job is to fill the tanks with compressed air or Nitrox.
  • RIB Driver
  • While the divers are underwater, the RIB drivers remain nearby to pick them up at any time, if needed. Good RIB drivers do not lose contact with the diving group, even if the current causes the divers to take a different route than planned. They are of paramount importance to our safety as divers.
  • Cook
  • The cook is responsible for the physical well-being of the guests and does so from early morning till late at night. Anyone who has ever tried to peel onions during rough seas—what to speak of cutting them-knows what they accomplish.
  • Assistant Cook
  • The assistant cook is the second man in the galley.
  • Steward
  • The Steward serves the guests in the dining room and on deck and is also responsible for cleaning the cabins and making the beds.
  • Seamen
  • Depending on the size of the ship, the crew comprises between one to four seamen, whose main task is to moor the ship at the dive sites by going by RIB to the moorings attached to the reef and fastening the ship to them. They also keep the boat clean along with the steward.

  • Tipping Etiquette
  • Must I give the crew a tip? Of course not, tipping at the end of a tour is voluntary. You should, however, note that the tip is an important source of income for the crew. Their basic salary is usually so low that it can only be considered adequate after getting an additional contribution by the tour passengers.
  • an amount of 70 euros per passenger per week is currently recommended. This amount can also be adjusted up or down depending on the performance and efforts of the crew. The tip is usually collected by a passenger and handed over to the captain, who will then distribute the money among all of his crew members. If we consider for example that RIB drivers are available to us divers up to eight hours a day under the scorching sun on choppy seas, or that the cook usually spends 14 hours for us in a small, cramped and hot galley, the 35 euros are certainly more than justified.
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